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Should I use BB cream or CC cream?

If you’ve set foot in Sephora, a drugstore or anywhere near a cosmetics counter lately, chances are you’ve been bombarded by a bewildering array of flesh colored fluids. The alphabet formulations-like BB cream, CC cream, and soon DD creams-have joined tinted moisturizers and standard foundation on the shelves as potential skin-perfecting options. But what do they all (supposedly) do? What’s the difference between them? And most importantly: Which should you use?

Tinted Moisturizer

The name is pretty self explanatory: The product gives you a bit of color with a moisturizing benefit-the color is usually pretty sheer. My sense is that they may be headed for extinction, or at least hibernation. While tinted moisturizers are still on the market and probably still have many fans, I haven’t seen a new launch for one in quite a while–alphabet creams are all the rage now.

Tinted Moisturizer

BB creams

The initials BB stand for beauty balm. BB creams are an Asian import that have become super popular in the last two years here in the US. BB creams provide coverage with added skin care benefits like SPF and anti-oxidants-the list goes on depending on what brand you choose. They’re lighter than foundation but heavier than tinted moisturizers. While the additives in BB creams can have the same efficacy as they would in stand-alone serums, be careful about counting on BB creams for adequate sun protection. “My only concern is that since BB cream is generally tinted, women use less on their face,” Manhattan dermatologist Dr. Heidi Waldorf said. Meaning you won’t slather it on the way you do-or should-with a more traditional sunscreen, resulting in inadequate protection.

BB creams

CC creams

The difference between BB and CC creams is subtle-CC generally stands for “color correcting” and the products are meant to address issues like redness or sallowness (usually with light-diffusing particles), whereas BB creams are like lighter foundation with a few skin care benefits thrown in. “CC cream is a color corrector and will be lighter on the skin [than a BB cream],” celeb makeup artist Nico Guilis told us. “They have more of a whipped, light, fluffy feel and finish-kind of the new and improved BB.”

While BB and CC creams are marketed for separate issues, and are theoretically different, I’ve tried many BBs and a few CC creams–and honestly, they’re almost the same. Where it gets most confusing here is that BB/CC benefits and coverage vary greatly among different brands. For example, Clinique’s CC cream is definitely more opaque than some BB creams I’ve tried from other brands. So go figure. You have to be diligent in reading ingredients and most importantly, trying them out to figure out what you want and need.

CC creams

DD creams

Julep is releasing what it’s calling a “Dynamic Do-All” cream this summer, and it kinda sounds like a BB/CC hybrid. Weirdly, the cosmetics industry was predicting something completely different for DD creams. Back in November of 2012, a cosmetics industry analyst told Cosmetic Design (a trade website) that a number of DD creams, called “Daily Defense” creams were poised to launch, but they aren’t for your face-rather they are “heavy duty body and foot creams.” So it will be interesting to see if Julep single-handedly just changed that category with its forthcoming launch.

DD creams

Foundation

So if BB and CC creams provide some decent coverage and even skin care benefits, is this the end of traditional foundation as we know it? Probably not.

Guilis prefers traditional foundations, because she can custom mix them. And this highlights probably the most important difference between all these products: BB/CC creams and tinted moisturizers usually come in only a few shades, while foundations can come in dozens, ensuring a more exact skin match. “To me personally (BB and CC creams) are kind of like a shampoo and conditioner all-in-one–it doesn’t give the (exact) finish you want,” Guilis said. I’ve even heard several makeup artists say they like to use BB cream as a primer–and then put foundation on top.

While there are a lot of options out there for skin coverage, I’m inclined to consider it a good thing. The more choices, the better right? Just don’t fall for the marketing, and try them out before you buy them.

Foundation

Are BB, CC, or DD Creams Must-Have Products?

The simplest answer to this question is “no.” The best of them can be convenient products for people looking for all-in-one sun protection, hydration, and complexion camouflage but the reality is that there’s nothing particularly revolutionary or special about them. Most Western-style BB creams are tinted moisturizers or, in the case of CC creams, lightweight foundations dressed up with a new name.

The best BB creams and CC creams do add some impressive beneficial ingredients but that certainly isn’t the case for all regardless of their labeling. These can be worth checking out, but remember to look at them with a critical eye and not be seduced by those tempting claims!

Recommendations

For oily skin: Dr. Jart+ BB Dis-A-Pore Beauty Balm ($36, sephora.com) is ideal for oily skin because it conceals enlarged pores or blemishes—without further adding to the oily problem.

For blemish-prone skin: Hydroxatone Anti-Acne CC Cream ($39, ulta.com) is basically acne treatment disguised as makeup. With salicylic acid as the main ingredient, this product helps with breakouts while adding a touch of coverage to hide those unsightly blemishes.

For aging skin: Guerlain Super Aqua-Serum BB Hydra+ ($79, sephora.com) is a two-in-one serum that not only adds a light touch of color, but it hydrates, plumps, and contains anti-aging ingredients too.

For fair skin: Yves Saint Laurent Forever Light Creator CC Primer ($45, sephora.com) is a stellar choice for anyone with fair skin that can tend to need a little color correcting. This primer boosts skin’s own natural hues and minimizes pores at the same time.

For dark skin: Shea Moisture CC Cram SPF 15 ($16, ulta.com) has a wide range of shades and provides a semi-matte finish, making it a great option for darker skin tones.

For sun protection: Physicians Formula Organic Wear 100% Natural Origin Work It! Marathonista Tinted Moisturizer SPF 40 ($15, ulta.com) is a smooth blend of a tinted moisturizer with high-performance SPF.